Anti-Asian Sentiment Continues in San Francisco

JusticeForAsianAmerican.org

 

The group of six (6) Asian Americans from San Francisco Juvenile Probation Department jointly filed a lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco for Civil Rights violations involving discrimination due to their race and ethnicity.

 

San Francisco, CA – The group of six (6) Asian Americans including three (3) Chinese Americans, one (1) Japanese American, one (1) Asian Indian female, one (1) Asian Pacific female from San Francisco Juvenile Probation Department joint filed a lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco for various Civil Rights violations involving discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and retaliation based upon their race and ethnicity. The causes of action in the complaint include, but is not limited to, non-Asian supervisor demanding sexual favors in exchange for job security or promotional opportunities from Asian female employees, commanding Asian employees to clean up human feces outside their job description and in contravention of corporate policy rather than using existing and available trained janitorial waste technicians, retaliation against Asian whistleblowers complaining of racial discrimination, filing wrongful and/or false allegations against many Asian American employees making them essentially unqualified to be promoted or advanced within their employment positions, being stigmatized in the work force, etc. [Source: U.S. District Court, Northern California (SF-Oakland) #CV08-04702 (10/10/2008); Ninth Circuit Court #12-16349 (6/12/2012); Justia.com; and www.pacer.gov.]

 

It should be no surprise that San Francisco has a long history of exercising racial discrimination especially to Chinese and Japanese Americans dating back some one hundred of sixty years. From slavery treatment during the 1860’s Railroad building era resulting in thousands of Chinese railroad laborer perishing due to their employer’s negligence or foreseeable avalanches during the building process. The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 denied almost all Chinese access to the United States, but not any of the other races. The Japanese Internments of 1942 locked up some 120,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps without due process and equal protection. Many of these detainees were actually American citizens.

 

Since the Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed in 1943, attitudes toward the Chinese and other Asian nationalities and cultures in the United States have been slowly improving. However, harsh attitudes and prejudices still exist today; the effects of which are evident daily within our own backyards. In 2012, US-born basketball superstar Jeremy Lin, who grew up in San Francisco Bay Area, is openly stereotyped, mocked, ridiculed and called names in the mainstream media such as: “fortune cookie,” “yellow mamba,” “kung fu grip,” “chink in the armor” , “FOB”, and “from Taiwan.”

 

Support: The above Asian American employees are seeking public support for their on-going legal expenses of an appeal in the U.S. Ninth District Circuit Court via a “Raise A Dollar Campaign.” This can be done by Donating a Dollar and/or sharing this info with all your friends of the above news through JusticeForAsianAmerican.org. You will be helping others like yourself from being subjected to such unfair treatment by any employers. You may even be helping yourself so that you too won’t be subjected to such unfair treatment.

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